Floodtide: Stepping into the Unknown

May. 24th, 2017 08:45 pm
[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 13:45

Except for the book release re-boot series, I haven't been blogging as regularly as I like to. May has been a bit crazy in terms of travel/conventions and work pressures (you know, the job that pays my bills). I've had enough LHMP posts in the can to carry my through (though I need to record a podcast tonight that I haven't finished writing yet! The Civil War diaries have been a dropped ball for the last couple weeks. But I keep plugging away at the first draft of Floodtide, day by day. I think the Scrivener file is up to around 80k words or so, but this draft is so messy that I have no idea how that's going to settle out. This morning's session brought me up to the moment in time when Mother of Souls ends: the Feast of Saint Mauriz when they perform the quadruple mystery and break the curse and...well, but that's the question isn't it? The question that Floodtide answers, in part.

I'm up to the point when Floodtide moves beyond the fields the readers know, and when our protagonist Rozild finds herself having to make choices not only about her own future, but that may in some small way affect everyone around her. It's exciting and it's daunting. Daunting, in part, because one of the major things to tackle in revisions is to make sure that we have enough through-lines of conflict and action and agency through all the previous chapters of the book that the climax doesn't explode in my face.

Roz has so many conflicts to negotiate and so little power to face them down. All of them need to be braided together into a smooth and even cord. A lot of her experiences are superficially about survival and alliance rather than about growth. She has to survive the unfortunate discovery by her employer of her sexual orientation. She has to find a middle path between repression and candor in securing her future. She has to come up with the courage to love again...and then find a way to recover both the friendship and the security that she came close to destroying by acting on it. She has to learn how to be kind to people whose lives she doesn't understand. And she is about to face the need to sacrifice her own future for the greater good, and then to find it again in a second act of self-sacrifice.

Because love isn't just about having someone to hold you close in the dark. Sometimes love really is like the fanciful stories that Iulien Fulpi writes in her notebooks: the ones where you pledge your life and your sacred honor for another's sake, simply because that person is worthy of the sacrifice.

Major category: 
Publications: 

Courting Cardinals

May. 24th, 2017 03:14 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
I heard rustling and scratching outside my office window.  There in the bushes were a pair of cardinals, fluttering around and courting.  The male had a mouthful of something which he passed to the female.  Aww!  <3

EDIT 5/24/17:  Also today I spotted an indigo bunting perched on the pot hanger above the barrel garden.

Good News

May. 24th, 2017 03:12 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Good news includes all the things which make us happy or otherwise feel good. It can be personal or public. We never know when something wonderful will happen, and when it does, most people want to share it with someone. It's disappointing when nobody is there to appreciate it. Happily, blogging allows us to share our joys and pat each other on the back.

What good news have you had recently? Are you anticipating any more?

Wednesday Yardening

May. 24th, 2017 03:11 pm
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[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is cool and drizzly.

Round 1, I straightened the pole for the hanging baskets by the barrel garden, and wrapped cord around the shaft to fasten it to the barrel for more support. 

EDIT 5/24/17: After lunch, it was just spitting a bit, so I went out to sow some grass seed in bare patches around the old raspberry patch.  Of course, then it started really  raining.  :/

EDIT 5/24/17: When it stopped raining, I went back out to sow more grass seed.  It started raining again.

EDIT 5/24/17: Round 4, I sowed more grass seed in bare patches in the streetside yard.  This time I did not get rained out, and therefore got considerably more done.  \o/

As it is now dusk, I am done for the night.

Julie d’Aubigny

May. 24th, 2017 02:29 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
 ... a person of many names, fluid gender, and great escapades.  :D
lsanderson: (Default)
[personal profile] lsanderson
Food Photography, Over the Years
By JULIA TURSHEN

What’s New in the Supermarket? A Lot, and Not All of It Good
By STEPHANIE STROM

Fact-Checking a Mogul’s Claims About Avocado Toast, Millennials and Home Buying
By LINDA QIU and DANIEL VICTOR

Charcoal or Gas? Depends on What You’re Grilling



By SAM SIFTON
Recipes: Grilled Flounder | Grilled Soy-Basted Chicken Thighs With Spicy Cashews | Learn How to Grill

Gas or Charcoal?
What to Cook
By SAM SIFTON

Reviews From The Sweethome: Charcoal Grills | Gas Grills | Grilling Tools

A Green That Does More Than Garnish



City Kitchen
By DAVID TANIS
Recipe: Watercress Salad With Raw Beets and Radishes


A Bold Take on Asparagus, Deep in Its Season
A Good Appetite
By MELISSA CLARK
Recipe: Roasted Asparagus and Scallion Salad

Crab, Meet Sugar Snap Peas


A Good Appetite
By MELISSA CLARK
Recipe: Crab Pasta With Snap Peas

‘Modern Mexican’ Steps Into the Spotlight



By JULIA MOSKIN

Sharing Moroccan Shakshuka With Mourad Lahlou



By MELISSA CLARK
Recipe: Moroccan Shakshuka

Classic Mediterranean Flavors, Enlivened by Ramps



City Kitchen
By DAVID TANIS
Recipe: Sautéed Lamb Chops With Ramps, Anchovy, Capers and Olives

Chowder-Soaked Toast Any Chef Would Want to Claim



Eat
By GABRIELLE HAMILTON
Recipe: Chowder-Soaked Toast

The Challenge of Perfect Phyllo



By YOTAM OTTOLENGHI
Recipes: Walnut, Cinnamon and Halloumi Baklava | Feta and Herb Phyllo Tart

Another ‘Twin Peaks’ Puzzle: How to Make That Cherry Pie



By SARA BONISTEEL
Recipe: ‘Twin Peaks’ Cherry Pie

A Galette That Lets Early Strawberries Shine
A Good Appetite
By MELISSA CLARK
Recipe: Strawberry and Pistachio Galette

Jewish Delicacies Beguile the German Capital
By LINDSAY GELLMAN

In the Bars of Berlin, Both the Drinks and Design Are Bracing
Pursuits
By ROBERT SIMONSON

Let’s Be Clear: Bad Wines Are Bad Wines, Period
Eric Asimov
THE POUR

The Ideal Aperitif: Good Vermouth, Cool and Fragrant
Eric Asimov
THE POUR

Your Next Lesson: Spätlese Riesling
Wine School
By ERIC ASIMOV

Surprise! Southern Comfort Has No Whiskey. But Soon It Will.
By ROBERT SIMONSON

Beatrice Trum Hunter, ‘Natural Foods Cookbook’ Author, Dies at 98
By SAM ROBERTS

Henry Chung, Who Helped Bring Hunan’s Flavors to America, Dies at 98
点击查看本文中文版
By RICHARD SANDOMIR

Not the Onion

May. 24th, 2017 12:04 pm
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[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Anne of Green Gables proves child labour is good! And Batman proves that we don't need cops, just highly motivated oligarchs in tights.
[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 07:00

This book really needs to go on my To Be Read list! Gail Garriger has several intertwined paranormal/steampunky series. Romancing the Inventor tosses in a lesbian romance as well as a mad scientist. Oh, and vampires. Mustn't forget the vampires.

Imogene Hale is a lowly parlourmaid with a soul-crushing secret. Seeking solace, she takes work at a local hive, only to fall desperately in love with the amazing lady inventor the vampires are keeping in the potting shed. Genevieve Lefoux is heartsick, lonely, and French. With culture, class, and the lady herself set against the match, can Imogene and her duster overcome all odds and win Genevieve’s heart, or will the vampires suck both of them dry?


It can be hard to find mainstream SFF books with "incidental lesbians" -- lesbian characters in stories that aren't "about" sexuality. Books like Romancing the Inventor give me how that some day publishing will be a place where books like the Alpennia series could have found a home in mainstream SFF. In the mean time, if you love mainstream SFF but wish it had more queer women in it, check out Mother of Souls.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

Major category: 
hrj: (Default)
[personal profile] hrj

This book really needs to go on my To Be Read list! Gail Garriger has several intertwined paranormal/steampunky series. Romancing the Invntor tosses in a lesbian romance as well as a mad scientist. Oh, and vampires. Mustn't forget the vampires.

Imogene Hale is a lowly parlourmaid with a soul-crushing secret. Seeking solace, she takes work at a local hive, only to fall desperately in love with the amazing lady inventor the vampires are keeping in the potting shed. Genevieve Lefoux is heartsick, lonely, and French. With culture, class, and the lady herself set against the match, can Imogene and her duster overcome all odds and win Genevieve’s heart, or will the vampires suck both of them dry?


It can be hard to find mainstream SFF books with "incidental lesbians" -- lesbian characters in stories that aren't "about" sexuality. Books like Romancing the Inventor give me how that some day publishing will be a place where books like the Alpennia series could have found a home in mainstream SFF. In the mean time, if you love mainstream SFF but wish it had more queer women in it, check out Mother of Souls.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

Just discovered this was still here!

May. 24th, 2017 08:41 am
j_cheney: (Default)
[personal profile] j_cheney
I haven't posted here since 2013! Yikes! I guess a revamp here will be on my list of things to do tomorrow...

Wednesday

May. 24th, 2017 07:33 am
marthawells: (Stargate)
[personal profile] marthawells
I don't have a New Book Wednesday yet, but here's some good stuff that happened:

* We got a new mattress! Our old mattress was sagging on each side and had a hump in the middle and was getting increasingly painful. The new one was delivered yesterday and so far, so good. At the store we looked at a fancy one that sucked the heat out of your body while you were sleeping, but it was more than twice what ours cost and I did wonder how comfortable it would be in the winter.

* The paperback edition of The Murderbot Diaries is back in stock at Barnes & Noble, Powells, Indigo, BooksaMillion, Book Depository, and Amazon US, if you were still looking for a copy.

* I cleared out our guestroom closet and my office and got rid of a lot of random crap.

* I've been trying to get Murderbot 4 started and for about two weeks and finally got the first scene written. It and Murderbot 3 are not sold yet, so keep your fingers crossed.

* I got a Raksura Patreon story started and about halfway finished.

* When we were at Comicpalooza, we walked past the end of the row where one of the big Star Wars cosplaying groups had their booth, and they had a full-size backdrop of a Death Star corridor for people to take pictures in front of. One of the people in a stormtrooper costume was standing in front of it, and as we slowed down to look at backdrop, and the stormtrooper did the voice-synthesizer "Move along, move along" bit. It was pretty hilarious.

* We also saw a full-size Taun-taun with rider costume.
mtl: Me as a POP! figure (Default)
[personal profile] mtl
So yesterday, I received an email from Flickr that Yahoo was selling to Verizon and, as such, had a new ToS going into effect on June 8. 

I really don't use Yahoo much, but there's one Yahoo group that I am a part of that's been going strong since back when we were still at One Group back in 1998. I'm not a group owner, but have sent a message to the owner seeing if that's something she wants to do. I'm really not a fan of Verizon.

I do want to archive a couple of groups that are moribund (and for which I am the owner), mostly for history's sake, but I've only found this info, which involves either a python script or a perl script. Sigh. I'm fairly techie, but this is a bit beyond me. I'm pretty much an HTML coder.

If anyone's got any suggestions on how to archive the groups I own without having to struggle through coding things, that would be awesome. FWIW, I'm on a Mac, so no Windows solutions, pls. 

Everyday Life in Joseon-Era Korea

May. 23rd, 2017 05:51 pm
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[personal profile] yhlee
I first heard of Everyday Life in Joseon-Era Korea: Economy and Society, ed. Michael D. Shin, from a post by [personal profile] thistleingrey. What's sad about this book is not that it's poorly written or conceived, but that it's priced so damn high; the lowest price I'm seeing on Amazon is over $100 (!). This is a translation of a collection of essays by Korean historians about Joseon-era Korea, particularly emphasizing the viewpoint of the common people rather than the yangban (nobles) and royalty. As such, the topics are ones that, as [personal profile] thistleingrey notes, are rarely discussed about this period in English. I found the introductory essay by Michael D. Shin particularly valuable, as it discusses Korean historiography and how it has been affected by, e.g., the Japanese occupation and Korean nationalism; it was really great to have it put the rest of the book in context.

I found this interesting as additional background and research reading for my current novel WIP, DRAGON PEARL, although I am not choosing to base my space opera setting very closely on historical Korea, let alone Joseon. For example, Joseon Korea tended to become more patriarchal as time went on due to the influence of Neo-Confucianism, and I wanted to depict a society more egalitarian in its attitudes toward gender. Earlier periods of Korea were kinder to women, but not only is there less material on earlier periods to begin with, it is damn near impossible to find such material in English, and unfortunately I am not fluent in either Korean or Classical Chinese.

Also, I was fascinated by Seo Tae-Won's "The Military Life," which mostly amazes me in that I'm not sure how the Joseon military system was even able to function! For example, many commoner households owed military service to the government, but they were not paid or equipped or given uniforms, which was hard on their families, especially if they were needed at home for the farming...yikes.

Meanwhile, the most entertaining of the essays (if you want to judge them that way) are Jung Jin Young's "Did Fake Genealogies Exist?", which drily notes that it can't be possible that EVERY SINGLE KOREAN comes from a yangban lineage, and discusses some more complicating factors in Korean family lines, and the very last one, "The Outhouses of the Royal Palaces" by Hong Soon Min.

Here is the table of contents for the curious:

Part One: Economy
1. Farming in the Joseon Period
2. A Typical Day and Year in the Life of the Peasantry
3. The Tax Burden of the Peasantry
4. Currency and the Value of Money
5. The Merchants of Seoul
6. The Joys and Sorrows of the Itinerant Merchants
7. Foreign Trade and Interpreter Officials
8. Salt: White Gold
9. Seeking Work at Mines
10. When Did Joseon's Population Reach Ten Million?

Part Two: Society
11. Rural Society and Zhu Xi's Community Compact
12. Why Did Peasants Create the Dure?
13. Did Fake Genealogies Exist?
14. The Baekjeong Class
15. The Rebellion of Im Ggeokjeong
16. Did People Divorce in the Joseon Period?
17. The Educational System
18. Military Life
19. The Penal System
20. Eating Culture
21. Liquor and Taverns
22. Tea and Tobacco
23. The Outhouses of the Royal Palaces

Thank you to the generous benefactor who donated this book.

Coming to WisCon - probably.

May. 23rd, 2017 06:47 pm
commodorified: very worried stuffed crocodile clutching a pillow (not coping)
[personal profile] commodorified posting in [community profile] wiscon
Some of you might remember me, and a few of you might remember that I've had severe allergy problems three times now with Madison in the spring, so, unusually for me, here is a 'care and feeding' post letting people as are interested know what I will and won't be up to this weekend.

I am trepidacious, and also excited.

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