May. 6th, 2017

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I'm headed back to WisCon for the first time in a couple of years. I've got a reading and a couple of panels and will be floating around. I will have the new print edition of Out of This World: Queer Speculative Fiction Stories with me and will try to make it available in the Dealer's Room as well. Invite me to tea or breakfast ot such. My attention is drawn to shiny things, chocolate and good tea, just saying. :-)

Friday:
  • 10:30PM - Yes We Are Internet (Conference Room 4) - Group reading by Robyn Bennis, Seth Frost, Aimee Ogden and Catherine Lundoff (I've never met these folks other than on Twitter, so we will be living up to the name)
Saturday
  • The Business of the Small Press (scheduled)      Sat, 10:00–11:15 am     Conference
Moderator: J. Boone Dryden. Timmi Duchamp, Catherine Lundoff, Michael Damian Thomas
Small press publishers, whether just starting out or long-time owners, come to talk about the challenges of getting started and sustaining the business. What's the nitty-gritty that readers and writers don't get to see? How are contracts drafted? What legal know-how is needed? How do you balance the books?

  • Red As Blood: Women and Gothic Horror (scheduled)     moderator     Sat, 1:00–2:15 pm     Caucus
Moderator: Catherine Lundoff. Emily B. Cataneo, Katie Sapede, Cath Schaff-Stump , Sheree Renée Thomas
Women figure prominently in classic Gothic horror as victims, protagonists, or villains and Gothic horror has had a profound influence on fantasy as a genre (Tanith Lee and Angela Carter, to name a couple of examples.) Television shows like Penny Dreadful and films like Crimson Peak help keep the subgenre alive and appealing to new generations. What makes Gothic tales so appealing? What do we see as the future for Gothic tales and what would we like to see more/less of?
Monday:
  • Catherine Lundoff, Presentation. Assembly Room, 8:30-9:45AM
  • Aging in Speculative Fiction - Aging is subject to a wide range of magical cures and fixes in the genre as a whole. On the one hand, older characters in genre can be powerful (and/or oppressive) authority figures. At the same time, older characters are subject to sacrificial redshirting or are rendered invisible. Works that include older women as protagonists are still a rarity (and the number of older LGBTQ+ characters and/or older women of color is considerably smaller) despite a number of factors that should have brought greater changes in representation over the last couple of decades.
Come say hi!

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